teaching relevance in later life

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sejintenej
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teaching relevance in later life

Post by sejintenej »

To what extent (if any) was the area you followed at CH (sciences, languages, classics etc) benefit you in later life?

In my case I followed the sciences - physics, chemistry, but in later life such learning helped for a mere 2 or 3 minutes when I remembered how the Pilkington Float Glass process works. By contrast French lessons ** at CH put me off languages (still hate them) but four foreign languages were to become the mainstay of my home, sporting and financial life.

In retrospect how did CH teaching help you in later life?


** my French teacher was interviewed by an SOE language instructor brought up in France and declaimed as knowing nothing/.
I have come to the conclusion that politics is too serious a matter to be left to the politicians.
~Charles de Gaulle, French general & politician
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Katharine
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Re: teaching relevance in later life

Post by Katharine »

Having done double Maths & Physics at A level, then a degree in Maths, I taught Maths and Physics for years, so yes what I learnt at school did help in later life!

I still take on posts requiring numeracy and am Treasurer for two small charities.
Katharine Dobson (Hills) 6.14, 1959 - 1965
rockfreak
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Re: teaching relevance in later life

Post by rockfreak »

I never got to teaching but realised early in life that words were my thing rather than numbers. I was told by Gad at about age 14 that I could write but STEM subjects were, I'm afraid, a mystery to me. I used to get derisory marks in these subjects. The trouble was that it seemed to me that you have more of a marketable skill with numbers than words. So I floundered around for many years after school trying to work out how to make a living with words, and made a belated entry into magazine journalism - in this case the music press. I was off and flying. Being paid for something that I loved. But as far as school goes I think I was just a late starter. What can you write about at age 14 or 15? Especially in the monastic seclusion of an English boarding school. But thanks to Gad and David Herbert who I remember as helping push me in the direction of how to use words. I do remember doing an essay for Herbert and using the term "the order of the day". It came back with a note in the margin: "Ugh! Dreadful cliche!"
time please
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Re: teaching relevance in later life

Post by time please »

Nothing at all!
Well maybe that is not quite right, all the bullying, the punishments, predators etc etc made me realise that there is another way of doing things and treating people. Which is why presumably I have worked in social welfare all of my life.
scrub
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Re: teaching relevance in later life

Post by scrub »

sejintenej wrote: Wed Nov 09, 2022 9:33 amIn retrospect how did CH teaching help you in later life?
The A levels in Chemistry, Biology, and Maths I took were necessary to get into uni to do a BSc, which was a requirement for doing a PhD, which in turn is part of the core criteria for working as a research scientist, a position I currently get paid for doing.

So from that point of view, it started me on the road to where I am.

That said, most of the knowledge that wasn't forgotten 10 minutes after the exam was superseded by the time I finished 1st year, but that's normal for a lot of the sciences.

I live and work in France, and GCSE French did give me a little bit of a head start in terms of learning the language.

Outside that though, the things I learned at CH that stayed with me weren't from the teaching.
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pierre
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Re: teaching relevance in later life

Post by pierre »

Like you I was in the doldrums on leaving ch. I did sciences for a levels but failed to get grades sufficient for uni.
Career advice at housey was frankly appalling : a grotty filing cabinet of leaflets tucked into an out of the corner of the new science block. I am relieved to see the the old library is now a rather swishy career centre.
I eventually ended up as a trainee in fellmongery processing sheepskins fresh from the abbatoir into wool and leather using some rather toxic chemicals. CH chemistry lab experience of titration enabled me to get a leg on the ladder early on in production control. Better than being knee deep in sh1t which was the lot of other trainees!
A total career change, then saw me in the department of trade in London using English language skills to draft and compile ministerial briefing material and then 3 years in private office of both labour and conservative ministers enabling me to gain experience of both ends of the spectrum. Yes minister was on the TV at the time and is surprising how right they got it!! Departmental policy at the time was to be moved on to different jobs at regular intervals but somehow I managed to stick with trade promotion work for the most part. This is how I landed the plum job of project manager of UK national pavilions at trade fairs in France over 100 per year, everything from Cannes film and music festivals, Paris heavy construction equipment, and the seasonal ready to wear fashion events. The food shows were my favourite! This entailed complex negotiations with french exhibition organisers to book space in prime locations using ch o level french. The french were never too easy dealing with Brits but mutual respect eventually won over.
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loringa
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Re: teaching relevance in later life

Post by loringa »

sejintenej wrote: Wed Nov 09, 2022 9:33 am
In retrospect how did CH teaching help you in later life?
Christ's Hospital was excellent preparation for my chosen career though it wasn't one that Ratty James the careers master wanted me to go in to particularly. Despite making a horlicks of my maths A Level (Grade D :-() my A Levels were good enough for what I required. Equally important, the excellent Pinky Palmer developed my love of both history, especially American history in his case, and English Literature; Louis Bardot and Mr Farrar (can't remember his first name) gave me enough French to get by quite passably, and Ken Grimshaw and the rest of the excellent team in the Manual School taught me essential practical skills. I learned to cook and to read a map in the Scouts (very useful as I have a rubbish sense of direction), Chief Bradley taught me to shoot and John Shippen et al taught me to love the British Isles, particularly the lumpy bits and the wet bits. On the other hand, I was put off the theatre by Duncan Noel-Paton's over-enthusiasm for it, if not for life then for a good twenty years, and I have always loathed team games which I largely credit to the continuous screaming of Dickie Dawe, otherwise a decent-enough bloke.

Overall, I got what I needed from Christ's Hospital; I was happy enough to leave and it was hardly the best days of my life, thank goodness, but it was a good grounding and a decent preparation for what came next. I am grateful to the foundation and pleased to give back in a small way when I can.
Katharine
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Re: teaching relevance in later life

Post by Katharine »

I don’t remember anything in the way of careers advice at Hertford, whether that was because I was deemed to be a dead cert for university I don’t know. I don’t remember any discussion about it at all - not even the
pierre wrote: Thu Nov 10, 2022 3:36 pm grotty filing cabinet of leaflets tucked into an out of the corner of the new science block.
Katharine Dobson (Hills) 6.14, 1959 - 1965
seajayuu
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Re: teaching relevance in later life

Post by seajayuu »

You are right Katharine - absolutely no carteers advice at Hertford. In addition our external exam results were sent to us by post with no follow up or support in any way. This is in stark contrast to the help that students receive now, both at CH and elsewhere.
Otter
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Re: teaching relevance in later life

Post by Otter »

pierre wrote: Thu Nov 10, 2022 3:36 pm Career advice at housey was frankly appalling
Takes me back to a careers session on my GE.

The careers advisor, whose name escapes me, asked one boy what he wanted to do as a career. When the boy said he didn't know yet (I think a perfectly normal and respectable answer at age 15?), the careers advisor went absolutely ballistic, shouting at him saying that was absolutely not good enough and he will be unemployable, he didn't have any ambition, lack of respect for the Foundation and your parents who sent you here, bla bla bla. Somehow the kid kept his calm and replied, "So Miss, did you want to be a careers advisor when you were younger?"
scrub
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Re: teaching relevance in later life

Post by scrub »

Otter wrote: Mon Nov 21, 2022 12:33 pm
pierre wrote: Thu Nov 10, 2022 3:36 pmCareer advice at housey was frankly appalling
Takes me back to a careers session on my GE ...
I remember having careers advice session(s) during deps, and the advisor was one of the chemistry teachers. Can't remember his name, but think he was married to one of the Biology teachers(?).

Anyway, as a young 'un I wanted to be a vet. Sorted out work experience on my own and wasn't put off by the reality of it. Chose A levels based on what I'd need, etc.

Go in for my meeting with him, and while I can't remember all his words exactly, it went more or less: "I see you want to be a vet. No. You're not smart enough to get the grades you need, it'd be a waste of time submitting your application, so I'm not going to. You should really look into a trade."
That was pretty much it for the first round of advice.
I sort of laughed it off and spent a fair bit of time trying to work out how to get around his "help".

Don't know if he was like that with everyone or just me, but he wasn't the first (or last) teacher to suggest that I should have left after my GCSEs.
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