Freaky in the FT

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rockfreak
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Re: Freaky in the FT

Post by rockfreak »

And again! Another of my letters goes into the FT - this weekend's edition. And guess what? It's about, wait for it, public schools! Rishi (several miles up my own backside) Sunak and his noble £100,000 gift for bursaries to Winchester College. But there's a paywall on the FT and I'm afraid you'll have to buy a copy at the grand sum of £4.50 (and cheap at the price, guv!) or sneak a look at your local newsagents. Letter is titled: "Here's a statistic that would shame any Victorian head".
sejintenej
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Re: Freaky in the FT

Post by sejintenej »

loringa wrote: Fri Jan 07, 2022 8:16 am
As for one's interactions with those who supported Brexit and those who voted to remain, it is becoming increasingly difficult to identify the former group as they have gone so very quiet (including on this forum)! Within my (extended) family, as far as I know it was only a small number of the elderly who voted to leave and we have agreed not to talk about it as support for remain was otherwise pretty much universal.
Andrew. The vote on Brexit happened a considerable time ago as did the decision to exit Calais during the middle ages or even the decision by the French king to accept that the Danes had successfully invaded Normandy.

We are fixed with those facts of life, we have to simply live with them. Freedom from EU control allowed the possibility of building our economy to Far East levels but ..... I have just read a Canadian novel which sums up our government to a tee. They will not do anything to annoy their constituents so they will waste their time on petty matters rather than opt for the (temporarily unpleasant) conditions which would allow Britain to prosper. That way they personally will (hope to) stay on the gravy train. Had I the power I would decree that nobody could stay in a government post more than two terms and then could not serve in the Civil Service.

As a local example of the simple stupidity it has been decided to make my local roads 20mph limited. OK so there is a concept in officer training that you do not give an order that you know will not be obeyed; our roads have had cars normally driving to 40 plus mph and Mr Plod does f*** all. (He convicts 5% of burglaries!). You can put up signs but they are routinely ignored so, given Army training they should not exist. Conversely the police have recommended that low speed limits should be removed but the erks involved simply ignore the experts.

That example is translated into higher levels of so-called government who cannot be bothered to answer constituents but still demand our obedience to their hairbrained schemes. From work carried out in the seventies Britain could be self sufficient for green electricity but the government stopped it. Those involved then went abroad and he Portuguese now have the use of the methods by the benefit of the UK research.
Laughing at your own mistakes may lengthen your life. Laughing at your wife’s mistakes will surely shorten it.
Avon
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Re: Freaky in the FT

Post by Avon »

sejintenej wrote: Sun May 08, 2022 4:55 pm
loringa wrote: Fri Jan 07, 2022 8:16 am
As for one's interactions with those who supported Brexit and those who voted to remain, it is becoming increasingly difficult to identify the former group as they have gone so very quiet (including on this forum)! Within my (extended) family, as far as I know it was only a small number of the elderly who voted to leave and we have agreed not to talk about it as support for remain was otherwise pretty much universal.
Andrew. The vote on Brexit happened a considerable time ago as did the decision to exit Calais during the middle ages or even the decision by the French king to accept that the Danes had successfully invaded Normandy.

We are fixed with those facts of life, we have to simply live with them.
No. Brexit can and will be reversed - it is just a matter of time. I hope it’s sufficiently swift to irk the aged, bigoted, hidebound, lumpen idiots who voted for it.
loringa
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Re: Freaky in the FT

Post by loringa »

Off topic I know but ...
sejintenej wrote: Sun May 08, 2022 4:55 pm
loringa wrote: Fri Jan 07, 2022 8:16 am
As for one's interactions with those who supported Brexit and those who voted to remain, it is becoming increasingly difficult to identify the former group as they have gone so very quiet (including on this forum)! Within my (extended) family, as far as I know it was only a small number of the elderly who voted to leave and we have agreed not to talk about it as support for remain was otherwise pretty much universal.
Andrew. The vote on Brexit happened a considerable time ago as did the decision to exit Calais during the middle ages or even the decision by the French king to accept that the Danes had successfully invaded Normandy.
Avon got there first but there is a huge difference between England's defeat by Henry II at Calais, another triumph of Queen Mary's glorious reign, and the entirely self-inflicted injury that is Brexit. The pedant in me wants to point out that 1558 is hardly medieval either, which is relevant as we are less than a century away from the Treaty of Westphalia on which our modern world, and the concept of nation states that underpins 'alliances' such as the EU, is built.

Reversing Brexit would be difficult; we wouldn't get the highly favourable terms we enjoyed previously for a start, but it is feasible if we are prepared to accept becoming part of Schengen, and adopting the Euro. The former would, of course, risk giving away the significant degree of control at our borders we previously enjoyed as a member state, but the Euro may start to look more attractive as the consequences of Brexit make themselves ever increasingly felt. These are also two things that Scotland would need to consider if it votes for independence: a hard border and a different currency from the rump UK.

Bottom line is this, whilst I am pretty certain the majority for Brexit has long evaporated there are clearly significant numbers of Brits, mainly English, who either believe the lies they were told by a certain Mr Johnson, or for some inexplicable (to me) reason actually believe we can be stronger outside one of the world's leading trading blocs. What is absolutely certain, however, is that our status on the world stage has been significantly diminished and once a reputation has been trashed, it is very hard to regain it.
sejintenej
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Re: Freaky in the FT

Post by sejintenej »

sejintenej wrote: Sun May 08, 2022 4:55 pm
loringa wrote: Fri Jan 07, 2022 8:16 am

Andrew. The vote on Brexit happened a considerable time ago as did the decision to exit Calais during the middle ages or even the decision by the French king to accept that the Danes had successfully invaded Normandy.
Avon got there first but there is a huge difference between England's defeat by Henry II at Calais, another triumph of Queen Mary's glorious reign, and the entirely self-inflicted injury that is Brexit.

My point was that Brexit is/was not the first gam-echanging change seriously affecting Britain. It might have taken a little while but Britain turned itself round before and it could do so again - IF the politicians, unions and money-men will allow it. Of course it will not a shipping of slaves nor (probably) the invasion / control over a large part of the world but with our technical ability it could be in engineering etc just as south east asia has done.
Reversing Brexit would be difficult;
I agree. Do we really want to be ruled by the likes of Britain haters like Macron and the rest of the Brussels cabal? We are already seeing splits where Brussels is trying to enforce illegal laws on members - laws which are forbidden by the constitutions of certain members. Indeed I understand that two EU member's top politicians would be arrested if they venture abroad!
Laughing at your own mistakes may lengthen your life. Laughing at your wife’s mistakes will surely shorten it.
rockfreak
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Re: Freaky in the FT

Post by rockfreak »

Today I get lead letter in the Guardian. About the modern phenomenon of the Tory party roundly insulting the electorate (Lee Anderson and the 30p meal). Generally it used not to happen in the post WW2 years because you don't really want to be slagging off the people you hope will vote for you, but after Thatcher created the worst unemployment since the war in her first administration Norman Tebbit was promptly up on his hind legs telling us to get on our bikes, and it's been a habit of the Tories ever since, much less so with Labour.
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