Data Protection Act

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sejintenej
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Data Protection Act

Post by sejintenej » Fri Aug 24, 2018 1:53 pm

copy of post elsewhere by J.R. » Fri Aug 24, 2018 11:13 am
I know it's going slightly off topic but as far as acknowledging birthdays on here, there is a possible small problem that could arrive concerning the Data Protection Act.

Yes, it is a bug*er. As I see it everyone here has freely elected to give the Forum their data and furthermore, has the opportunity to have that data removed. IF I send an email to another person via the site then Julian adds a preface allowing for the sender to have his/8her/its knuckles rapped hard.

I had all the photos of the farm I owned on an outside file which has hd to be wiped in accordance with the act.
I have been hearing thirdhand about things which, prior to the Act would have come to me direct; unfortunately those involved didn't ask my permission to retain my data so it got wiped and no message was sent to me.

I think our legal eagles will agree that the Companies Act 1948 was a model of competent writing (OK there is just one clause in Table A which is a bit uncertain) so why in tarnation cannot Parliament write laws which are complete and unambiguous and allow for sensible actions?

I put it down to the dumbing down of education. We had policy where I worked of not employing graduates but educating people ourselves - that followed a graduate whom we found could not do basic maths - when we terminated his probation early he tried to sue us on the grounds that it is an employer's duty to educate employees.
‘So, still happy you voted for my namesake who took away your health insurance, raised your taxes and should turn out to be a mental patient?’

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Re: Data Protection Act

Post by wurzel » Fri Aug 24, 2018 4:05 pm

you should try running a sports team where you have some players under 18, some over, some who want direct communication, some who want via parent and some with parents living apart who both want copies of everything. Where the team covers 3 academic years and what matters is they be U18 at midnight on Aug31st. I am supposed to keep a bunch of info including medical info (such as who as asthma or certain allergies) plus track things like injury recovery and keep team sheets, match cards etc but I am also follow GDPR guidance as well which in many places contradicts what I have to keep for other reasons. If I send team emails to myself Bcc'ing all others then a lot of them end up with it in their junk/spam depending upon email provider and apparently i am no longer allowed to create a google mail group to invite them to as that is not secure enough.


grrrrrrrrrrr

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Re: Data Protection Act

Post by J.R. » Fri Aug 24, 2018 8:30 pm

I'm totally pi**ed off with it all, especially after trying to get some of MY personal information from the receptionist at MY doctors surgery this afternoon.

I think I may now be persona non grata in there now. I wasn't rude. I didn't swear but left them in no doubt about my views of the educational standards of NHS receptionists in this day and age.
John Rutley. Prep B & Coleridge B. 1958-1963.

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Re: Data Protection Act

Post by SamT » Fri Aug 24, 2018 8:50 pm

Wurzel has my sympathy.

My dear Other Half fulminates about exactly the same issues daily!

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Re: Data Protection Act

Post by J.R. » Fri Aug 24, 2018 9:18 pm

Whilst I appreciate there must be safety guidelines, I had had to struggle with oesteo-arthritis to the surgery to get a new online password before the bank holiday.

The receptionist KNEW me. I didn't have photo ID, so I had to make a return journey to get some. A double round trip totalling nearly a mile.

JOBSWORTH OR WHAT ?

I think the practice now have no doubt of my views on their practice standards.
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Re: Data Protection Act

Post by Mid A 15 » Fri Aug 24, 2018 9:46 pm

J.R. wrote:
Fri Aug 24, 2018 9:18 pm
Whilst I appreciate there must be safety guidelines, I had had to struggle with oesteo-arthritis to the surgery to get a new online password before the bank holiday.

The receptionist KNEW me. I didn't have photo ID, so I had to make a return journey to get some. A double round trip totalling nearly a mile.

JOBSWORTH OR WHAT ?

I think the practice now have no doubt of my views on their practice standards.
The function of so-called data protection has never been to safeguard the private, personal details of individuals.

It is a blunt instrument to facilitate obfuscation by Public Bodies and Private Business.

Your experience illustrates the concept perfectly.
Ma A, Mid A 65 -72

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Re: Data Protection Act

Post by wurzel » Sun Aug 26, 2018 12:48 am

I was in the bank on Friday where someone was trying to open an account for their wife (both Poles) he had a plethora of ID but the bank clerk was refusing to open it as his utility bill was a print off of a statement of account and not a posted copy - he was trying to explain it was an account managed entirely online so there were no postal statements and she was trying to say she knew he was right but the rules had kept up with reality.

He was remaining far calmer than i would have been doing

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Re: Data Protection Act

Post by sejintenej » Sun Aug 26, 2018 10:49 am

wurzel wrote:
Sun Aug 26, 2018 12:48 am
I was in the bank on Friday where someone was trying to open an account for their wife (both Poles) he had a plethora of ID but the bank clerk was refusing to open it as his utility bill was a print off of a statement of account and not a posted copy - he was trying to explain it was an account managed entirely online so there were no postal statements and she was trying to say she knew he was right but the rules had kept up with reality.

He was remaining far calmer than i would have been doing
There are numerous other ways of checking peoples' addresses (though utility bills are a simple one); consider the case of someone living with their parents for example.
I have already mentioned that I couldn't be checked out to work with children because I have an adoption certificate and not (legally) a birth certificate which is what the local regulations require!
‘So, still happy you voted for my namesake who took away your health insurance, raised your taxes and should turn out to be a mental patient?’

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Re: Data Protection Act

Post by jhopgood » Sun Aug 26, 2018 6:10 pm

It is at times like this that the demise of common sense becomes more apparent.
It all depends who you get and whether they have the ability to use their last remnants of independent grey cells.
We have suffered much of the above, but it seems to be more prevalent in the UK than abroad.
I have always felt that in Spain, they have all the rules and regulations, but mainly apply them when they have no option. As a result, chatting to the official concerned with a good enough sob story, normally gets the desired result.
Even here, it can happen.
I went to the library to get a bus pass, taking passport etc and my driving licence with my UK address on it, and got the pass with no problem.
My wife does not drive and is not on the utility bills, so had no proof of address, but the local official took my word that my wife lived with me and gave her a pass.
Common sense reigned but as an isolated example.
I am sure many of you will point out the pitfalls of everyone doing things my way, but for me it works.
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Re: Data Protection Act

Post by MrEd » Sun Aug 26, 2018 9:49 pm

I think our legal eagles will agree that the Companies Act 1948 was a model of competent writing (OK there is just one clause in Table A which is a bit uncertain) so why in tarnation cannot Parliament write laws which are complete and unambiguous and allow for sensible actions?
Parliament doesn't really write most of Data Protection law as Data Protection is an EU competency so UK law implements EU law either by passing Acts of Parliament to implement EU directives or leaves it to the EU (as with the General Data Protection Regulation). Where the UK can pass law in this area, as in areas that are not EU competencies, like national security, the outcomes are scarcely better. The whole thing is so complicated that sorting out what is EU law and what is not it is like trying to establish the ingredients of a Bouillabaisse.

If you ever read a judgment of the European Court of Justice (in English), you might be forgiven for thinking that it has gone via translation software from Greek to Gaelic and then via Finnish into English, but this is just the way they talk, and think. However, that Court does not decide cases but answers questions about how the law is to be interpreted. At least most UK judgments tell a story that you can usually follow.

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Re: Data Protection Act

Post by charlesr » Mon Aug 27, 2018 12:23 pm

sejintenej wrote:
Sun Aug 26, 2018 10:49 am
I have already mentioned that I couldn't be checked out to work with children because I have an adoption certificate and not (legally) a birth certificate which is what the local regulations require!
That's odd. An adoption certificate is one of the documents listed as a "group 1 primary identity document" under the ID checks required for a basic check by the Disclosure and Barring Service. So for example, passport plus adoption cert and driving licence photocard would be enough (and there a re quite a few other docs listed in Groups 2a and 2b if you haven't got three from Group 1...
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Re: Data Protection Act

Post by sejintenej » Mon Aug 27, 2018 6:04 pm

charlesr wrote:
Mon Aug 27, 2018 12:23 pm
That's odd. An adoption certificate is one of the documents listed as a "group 1 primary identity document" under the ID checks required for a basic check by the Disclosure and Barring Service. So for example, passport plus adoption cert and driving licence photocard would be enough (and there a re quite a few other docs listed in Groups 2a and 2b if you haven't got three from Group 1...
We are talking about Essex Education Authority (or whtever they are called). Without knowing the technicalities I knew that because I am not allowed a birth certificate the adoption certificare should be OK (I got a passport with it!). The school involved was quite happy to accept a bank statement issued by a bank in south west France in French and I did have a utility bill but they refused a valid adoption certificate pointblank. I am only slightly furious that I couldn't be considered for the job. It's not racist, it's not sexist but what "ist" is it?

I have always known who my blood parents were (despite perhaps two adoptions plus a taking into guardianship) and am in contact with their children. After any adoption "they" are concerned about how adoptees confront their real parents so one should undergo all sorts of psycho interviews; I simply walked into St Catherine's House, put down my cash and ordered a birth certificate for the baby that I was born as. After that Liberal MP played silly bug**rs they now ask questions whenever a birth certificate is ordered for a person who would be under a certain age ?60. I truthfully told them it it was my birth certificate so they simply posted it to me making a mockery of the rules! I know I shouldn't use it within the UK but with Brexit I may well use it to get post-Brexit EU citizenship - there are interesting rules!
‘So, still happy you voted for my namesake who took away your health insurance, raised your taxes and should turn out to be a mental patient?’

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